Śmietnik

Wiki, a dokładnie WikiWiki, to nazwa pewnego rodzaju stron internetowych, które można tworzyć, edytować i zmieniać bezpośrednio z poziomu przeglądarki.

I właśnie o to chodzi! Jako część sieci Wikidot.com ten sajt jest częścią internetu, gdzie użytkownicy mogą edytować treść, uploadować pliki, komunikować się z sobą i współpracować.

"It is my view that the vegetarian manner of living, by its purely physical effect on the human temperament, would most beneficially influence the lot of mankind."

- Albert Einstein, physicist.

Justification This assessment is for the wild horse, not for the domesticated horse or any of its feral populations. Of the three subspecies that lived in historical times (since 1500 AD) two are Extinct while the third survives only in captivity or as highly managed introduced or reintroduced populations. Wild animals survived in eastern Europe (Poland, Belarus, Lithuania and Germany) through the eighteenth century, with the last wild indivi duals killed in 1814 (Novak 1999). The subspecies, known as the Plains Tarpan, lived on the steppes of southern Russia and the Ukraine. Its disappearance is attributed to interbreeding with domestic horses; hunting by people for sport and to protect their mares and forage; and the rapid settlement and cultivation of the steppes in the ninereenth century (Novak 1999). The last known wild individual died in Ukraine in 1879 (Novak 1999). Przewalski's Horse (E. ferus przewalskii) is the only subspecies still extant, but only as 'captive' populations. The last know sighting of animals in the wild was made in 1969 in Mongolia. All subsequent expenditions to find animals in both Mongolia and China have failed to find any evidence for their continued survival in the wild. For further details, see the account for this subspecies.

http://www.salamandra.org.pl/news/2002/dokumenty/kossak_znakowanie.html

<script src="http://wideo.gazeta.pl/w?xx=3956256&v=2" type="text/javascript"></script>

foto:Mount Erebus The flanks of Erebus are spiked with ice towers, hundreds of them, called fumaroles. Gas and heat seeping through the side of the volcano melt the snowpack above, carving out a cave. Steam escaping from the cave freezes as soon as it hits the air, building chimneys as high as 60 feet. neatorama.com

http://www.neatorama.com/2007/03/21/10-most-magnificent-trees-in-the-world/

wyłącznie stroną powitalną i prawdopodobnie jedną z pierwszych rzeczy, jakie chciał(a)byś zrobić to zmiana jej zawartość - wciskając guzik "edytuj" na dole strony.

Również na początku kilka słów przeprosin, ponieważ cały interfejs (okienka, komunikaty itp.) napisany jest w języku angielskim, a wsparcie innych języków jest dopiero tworzone - stąd mogą się pojawiać elementy zarówno w języku polskim, jak i angielskim.

Ponieważ jest to zupełnie nowy sajt, przygotowaliśmy kilka stron, które spowodują, że będzie choć trochę funkcjonalny od samego początku. Spójrz np. na strony:

* nav:side - to jest zawartość menu po lewej stronie - edytuj jeśli chcesz!
* nav:top - element nawigacyjny "u góry", można tam łatwo robić rozwijane menu; jest tam kilka "pustych" (prowadzących do nieistniejących stron) linków; wyedytuj je

Ideą inicjatywy Wikidot.com jest stworzenie bardzo konfigurowalnych sajtów. Aby się przekonać o całym wachlarzu możliwości, zajrzyj do Zarządzania Sajtem. Zwróć szczególną uwagę na sekcję Permissions (uprawnienia).

Jeśli chciałbyś stworzyć forum dyskusyjne, spójrz na sekcję Forum w Zarządzaniu Sajtem.

Ważną rzeczą jest także to, na jakiej licencji udostępniana będzie zawartość stron. Standardowo jest to Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 License. Zdecyduj, czy chcesz ją zmienić.

No i oczywiście gorąco zachęcamy do zapoznania się z działem dokumentacji i pomocy na Wikidot.com.

Powodzenia!!!

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<br />Canada's commercial seal hunt starts<br />
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<a href="http://www.care2.com/news/note_itServlet.php?shareID=339390&pg=/news/member/987608925/339390?saved=1" title="6 notes" class="note_it_counter" id="icon_461174af57a8f" style="background-image: url(http://dingo.care2.com/c2news/icon_noted_ani_27.gif);">6</a>

<img border="0" id="link-461174af57a8f" src="http://dingo.care2.com/c2news/icon_noteText_27_gray.gif" />

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What you can do to help the whales:

Ideas on possible activities for groups and individuals that wish to help the campaign against the resumption of commercial
whaling. Please choose those most appropriate for you:

* Write to the Minister responsible for whaling (probably either in the Fisheries or Environment Department)
* Write to the Leader of your Government and copy it to the press or deliver a ëletter of concerní to your government in
front of the press
Tell them why you oppose any resumption of commercial whaling, and why you believe any compromise on whaling is wrong;

In your letter urge them strongly to reconsider their position and oppose any resumption of commercial whaling.
o Issue a press release stating date and time you will be handing the letter in. Copy your letter with the pr to the media.
o Ask for an urgent meeting with your Government Minister and the IWC Commissioner concerning your governmentís position on
whaling
o Tell him/her how many members of the public you represent and that they want the government to have a strong policy
opposing any commercial whaling, or any compromises. Give him/her the reasons you believe whaling should be opposed. Offer
to support them;
o Ask to have regular meetings in the run up to the IWC meeting to discuss the governmentís position. Attend the annual IWC
meetings and keep a watch on your country's delegation's actions.Show your government that you take this issue very
seriously and want to monitor first-hand what they say and do at IWC meetings so that you can report back to the public at
home.
o Ask for daily meetings with your delegation at the IWC
o Ask to be on the delegation! Many countries have NGO representatives on their delegation. Contact your local political
representative
* Write to all politicians. Tell them about your governmentís position and the reasons to oppose whaling;
Ask them to help you change the governmentís position.
* Tell your supporters about whaling and why their government should
oppose it
* Send them copies of the Campaigns Pack, or direct them towards it on your website. Ask them to get active by writing letters, holding peaceful demonstrations, etc against whaling.
* Inform the media
* Issue
press releases and hold press conferences about the government's position and the reasons to oppose whaling;
Write articles and letters for press and magazines about whaling for publication. Include actions that the public can take
and addresses they can write to.
* Inform the public of the issues. You can reach the public through the press, your own
website and via other NGOs.
* Join forces with other NGOs who share your values
.
* Ask them to tell their supporters about the campaign
* Write joint letters and hold press conferences;
* Set up a coalition and ask to meet the government together.
* Get celebrity people involved.
* Give them a copy of the
Campaigns Pack, or highlight details of it.
* Ask them to make public statements opposing whaling and asking the Government to do the same;
* Ask them to attend your press conferences, protests etc.
* Organise peaceful and safe publicity events to attract public and
media attention
* For example, consider having an international whale or anti-whaling day in conjunction with other NGOs
around the world.
* Write to the Japanese and Norwegian Embassy in your country

Points to make in protest letters

Outlined below are some points you might like to include in a letter to your government and/or IWC Commissioner. Please use your own words as much as possible but emphasise that you do not want your government supporting the resumption of commercial whaling in any way.

1. The whalers have killed over 21,000 whales in defiance of the IWC moratorium introduced in 1986.
2. Japan and Norway are refusing to accept independently verifiable inspection and monitoring schemes under the RMS.
3. The IWC has no enforcement mechanisms. The whalers are notorious for breaking or bending IWC rules: they have killed thousands of whales during the IWC moratorium. There is no way to ensure they will respect the RMS either.
4. Norway has increased its quota to 674 whales this year, more than twice the limit agreed under the IWC’s Revised Management Procedure (RMP). The IWC also agreed the RMP should not be implemented before an RMS is completed, and that the RMP and RMS are adopted into the IWC Schedule together. Even then the moratorium on commercial whaling can only be lifted by a ¾ majority vote in favour of doing so.
5. Japan is expanding its ‘scientific whaling’ programme to 50 sei whales, 100 minkes, 50 Bryde's and 10 sperm whales in the north Pacific, and 440 minkes in the Southern Ocean. The IWC has raised extreme concern that minke whales have seriously declined in the southern ocean These whales are protected both by the IWC’s moratorium on commercial whaling and the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary.
6. Japan and Norway have announced plans to resume trade in whale meat this year breaking the CITES ban on international trade in whale products.
7. Japan has admitted to using foreign aid to recruit countries to the IWC to support whaling. If the moratorium on commercial whaling is overturned, it will be with these ‘bought’ votes and not by international agreement.
8. In recent years, the focus has switched to bringing whaling ‘back under control’ of the IWC, rather than permanently ending it, but lifting the moratorium to ‘save’ the IWC would be a fundamental betrayal of public opinion that opposes commercial whaling and wants the whaling ban enforced, not relaxed.
9. There is no justification for commercial whaling in the 21st century. Governments must not compromise on fundamental principles and should press for proper enforcement of the moratorium and the IWC.
10. The whalers are showing no sign of accepting IWC control over whaling under the RMS and the RMS will ‘legitimise’ commercial whaling. This is unacceptable for this and the following reasons:
* Environmental threats: there is increasing scientific evidence of the potentially catastrophic threats facing whales and their environment through climate change, pollution, over-fishing entanglement, ship strikes, chronic noise pollution and habitat loss. There is now greater concern than ever before that the world’s surviving whale populations cannot withstand these threats and renewed hunting.
* Scientific uncertainties: We do not know enough about the biology and ecology of whales, or the size and genetic structure of whale populations, to safely determine if they can be sustainably harvested.
* Cruelty: Modern killing methods, such as the explosive harpoon, cannot ensure instantaneous death and many whales suffer for long periods. Current methods used to assess insensibility or death in whales are grossly inadequate. Some whales may be butchered alive.
* Threats to human health: Whale meat is contaminated with pollutants, some acutely toxic, and much of it unsafe for human consumption. It will be difficult to prevent unsafe meat from entering the human food chain if commercial whaling is resumed under the RMS.
* Lack of Enforcement: The RMS is not as robust as other contemporary fisheries regimes and with no enforcement mechanisms it cannot meet its conservation and management objectives. It is, therefore, fundamentally flawed.

In conclusion, we call upon you to oppose completion and adoption of the RMS, and any resumption of commercial whaling, for the reasons above. We urge you to persuade other like-minded governments to work with you to address these important issues both within the IWC and at other appropriate fora, including CITES.
ounding Statement of the Global Whale Alliance

The Global Whale Alliance expresses our profound opposition to the IWC's Revised Management Scheme (RMS). We believe the completion and adoption of the RMS will inevitably result in the resumption of commercial whaling. This remains totally unacceptable in that:

A growing volume of scientific research provides clear warning of the potentially catastrophic catalogue of mounting threats to whales and their environment.
Commercial whaling is unnecessary and inherently cruel.
The consumption of contaminated whale meat poses a serious risk to human health
We do not know enough to manage whales sustainably even if this were still necessary or desirable.
The case for the global moratorium on commercial whaling is stronger today than when first introduced by the IWC in 1986.
Whale populations have not had time to recover from decades of over-exploitation. There is now greater cause than ever before to doubt that the world's surviving whale populations can withstand further hunting.

The Global Whale Alliance believes:

There is no justification for commercial whaling in the 21st century and a growing number of ethical, political, legal and scientific arguments against commercial whale hunting.
The moratorium on commercial whaling represents an international conservation treaty that must not be further undermined by the intransigent whaling countries and must be enforced by the collective will of the international community.
The IWC, to meet its founding obligation "to provide for the proper conservation of whale stocks and thus make possible the orderly development of the whaling industry," must uphold the moratorium and embark upon a long-term and comprehensive programme of benign research identifying and addressing the growing environmental threats to all cetaceans.
World governments, in order not to compromise on fundamental objections to commercial whaling, or their public mandate to oppose commercial whaling, must unite behind a common objective to preserve and strengthen the moratorium on commercial whaling and empower the IWC to enforce it.
The ever-growing global whale-watching industry, attracting over 9 million people and worth in excess of $1billion each year, is clearly a more sustainable, ethical and economically viable use of whales than commercial whaling.
The Global Whale Alliance calls for a working global coalition of like-minded non-governmental organisations, governments, scientists and members of the public to oppose the RMS and to support our campaign for the continuation and strengthening of the commercial whaling moratorium for the foreseeable future.
ounding Statement of the Global Whale Alliance

The Global Whale Alliance expresses our profound opposition to the IWC's Revised Management Scheme (RMS). We believe the completion and adoption of the RMS will inevitably result in the resumption of commercial whaling. This remains totally unacceptable in that:

A growing volume of scientific research provides clear warning of the potentially catastrophic catalogue of mounting threats to whales and their environment.
Commercial whaling is unnecessary and inherently cruel.
The consumption of contaminated whale meat poses a serious risk to human health
We do not know enough to manage whales sustainably even if this were still necessary or desirable.
The case for the global moratorium on commercial whaling is stronger today than when first introduced by the IWC in 1986.
Whale populations have not had time to recover from decades of over-exploitation. There is now greater cause than ever before to doubt that the world's surviving whale populations can withstand further hunting.

The Global Whale Alliance believes:

There is no justification for commercial whaling in the 21st century and a growing number of ethical, political, legal and scientific arguments against commercial whale hunting.
The moratorium on commercial whaling represents an international conservation treaty that must not be further undermined by the intransigent whaling countries and must be enforced by the collective will of the international community.
The IWC, to meet its founding obligation "to provide for the proper conservation of whale stocks and thus make possible the orderly development of the whaling industry," must uphold the moratorium and embark upon a long-term and comprehensive programme of benign research identifying and addressing the growing environmental threats to all cetaceans.
World governments, in order not to compromise on fundamental objections to commercial whaling, or their public mandate to oppose commercial whaling, must unite behind a common objective to preserve and strengthen the moratorium on commercial whaling and empower the IWC to enforce it.
The ever-growing global whale-watching industry, attracting over 9 million people and worth in excess of $1billion each year, is clearly a more sustainable, ethical and economically viable use of whales than commercial whaling.
The Global Whale Alliance calls for a working global coalition of like-minded non-governmental organisations, governments, scientists and members of the public to oppose the RMS and to support our campaign for the continuation and strengthening of the commercial whaling moratorium for the foreseeable future.

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